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Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia. CAES News
Lisa Baxter began her job on the UGA Tifton campus on March 1. She will focus her time in south Georgia, while Dennis Hancock serves north Georgia.
Forage Management
According to Lisa Baxter, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s newest forage agronomist, an unusually wet winter will cause problems with summer forage crop quality in Georgia.
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields. CAES News
Peanuts seedlings part of UGA research in this 2018 photo. Because of excess rainfall this winter, peanut plantings could be delayed in some fields.
El Nino Impact
Farmers who might face a delayed planting season can thank El Niño for Georgia’s exceedingly wet winter, according to Pam Knox, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agricultural climatologist. Row crop and vegetable producers usually begin planting their crops in late March through May, but excessive rainfall and cloudy conditions in January and February have left many fields soaked and soggy.
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent. CAES News
Pictured are Brian Hayes, Mitchell County Extension agent and county Extension coordinator; Monica Kilpatrick, state coordinator for Georgia Project WET; Debra Cox, Mitchell County 4-H Extension educator; Jennifer Grogan, retired Mitchell County 4-H agent and county Extension coordinator; and Calvin Perry, UGA C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park superintendent.
Georgia Project WET
Along with the University of Georgia's C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park, the UGA Cooperative Extension 4-H program in Mitchell County has been named the 2019 Georgia Project WET Organization of the Year for hosting a Georgia 4-H camp designed to teach children the importance of water conservation.
On October 10, 2018, intense winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground. CAES News
On October 10, 2018, intense winds from Hurricane Michael in Turner County, Georgia, blew cotton to the ground.
Production Season
Due to losses suffered during the last growing season and new tariffs, Georgia farmers are facing a sense of uncertainty surrounding the upcoming production season, according to University of Georgia agricultural economist Adam Rabinowitz.
This picture shows peach trees blooming in middle Georgia. As temperatures increase, trees will start to bloom across the state, and farmers are wary of a late-season freeze in March. CAES News
This picture shows peach trees blooming in middle Georgia. As temperatures increase, trees will start to bloom across the state, and farmers are wary of a late-season freeze in March.
Peach Trees
Peach tree buds are naturally protected from freezing temperatures, but unseasonably warm temperatures in early February have some Georgia trees already beginning to bloom.
Cotton is watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. Irrigation equipment needs to be serviced before the production season begins. CAES News
Cotton is watered on the UGA Tifton campus in 2014. Irrigation equipment needs to be serviced before the production season begins.
Irrigation Maintenance
Irrigation systems are one the most essential components of a farmer’s toolbox. After sitting idle during the winter, now is the time farmers should check their systems before the spring growing season.
Without removing wild pigs from the landscape, it is nearly impossible to prevent them from using and damaging wildlife food plots. Fortunately, it is possible to prevent wild pigs from raiding protein feeders. CAES News
Without removing wild pigs from the landscape, it is nearly impossible to prevent them from using and damaging wildlife food plots. Fortunately, it is possible to prevent wild pigs from raiding protein feeders.
Wild Pigs
Game feeders are often used to provide high-protein supplemental feeds to increase the body condition, antler size and overall survival rates within deer herds. Every year, thousands of tons of feed are distributed for whitetails, but a portion of that feed is consumed by wild pigs that readily displace native wildlife species.
Soybeans grow on a plant at a UGA lab in Athens. Soybean farmers will soon have a smart phone app to help know when to irrigate their crop. CAES News
Soybeans grow on a plant at a UGA lab in Athens. Soybean farmers will soon have a smart phone app to help know when to irrigate their crop.
SmartIrrigation App
Georgia soybean and blueberry farmers will soon have smartphone applications to supplement their practical knowledge with technical data on when to irrigate crops.
Georgia's Vidalia onion growers have finally planted this year's crop despite excessive rainfall in November and December that kept many producers out of the field. CAES News
Georgia's Vidalia onion growers have finally planted this year's crop despite excessive rainfall in November and December that kept many producers out of the field.
Onion Crop
Georgia’s Vidalia onion crop is planted and looks “promising,” according to Chris Tyson, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension’s area onion agent, but he cautions producers to be proactive in managing onion diseases.