News Stories - Page 3

Youth earned the right to participate by shooting a minimum score at one of 12 area qualifying matches held throughout the state and hosted by UGA Extension staff and 4-H SAFE-certified coaches. CAES News
Youth earned the right to participate by shooting a minimum score at one of 12 area qualifying matches held throughout the state and hosted by UGA Extension staff and 4-H SAFE-certified coaches.
4-H SAFE Event
More than 600 youth participated in the 2021 Georgia 4-H State Modified Trap Shotgun Match on May 8 at the UGA Beef Research Unit in Eatonton, Georgia.
The virtual solar seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options. The pictured solar tracking demonstration project was established at UGA in 2015. CAES News
The virtual solar seminar will help Georgia landowners navigate the complex world of solar energy options. The pictured solar tracking demonstration project was established at UGA in 2015.
Solar Seminar
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is offering a new virtual seminar, “Solar Energy in Rural Georgia: Opportunities and Considerations for Landowners,” on Tuesday, June 8. The event is free and open to the public, but participants must register online.
Georgia 4-H Poultry Judging CAES News
Georgia 4-H Poultry Judging
Livestock Judging
Spring is the season when Georgia 4-H’ers participate in annual competitions that test the skills they have developed during the year.
Izzy Burr, a UGA hospitality and food industry management student, works as an intern at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education & Hotel. CAES News
Izzy Burr, a UGA hospitality and food industry management student, works as an intern at the Georgia Center for Continuing Education & Hotel.
Staffing Crisis
After nearly 16 months, COVID-19 -related restrictions are lifting across the nation, breathing life back into the hospitality industry as people return to dining out in restaurants and traveling for both business and pleasure.
David Buckler works with Catoosa County 4-H'er Emily Momberg as part of the 4-H Tech Changemakers project. CAES News
David Buckler works with Catoosa County 4-H'er Emily Momberg as part of the 4-H Tech Changemakers project.
Teaching Tech
The University of Georgia 4-H program was selected as one of 23 land-grant universities to implement the 4-H Tech Changemakers program for the upcoming year.
Professor David Bertioli and senior research scientist Soraya Leal-Bertioli work together with peanut plants in their greenhouses at the Center for Applied Genetic Technologies. CAES News
Professor David Bertioli and senior research scientist Soraya Leal-Bertioli work together with peanut plants in their greenhouses at the Center for Applied Genetic Technologies.
Best of Both Worlds
The wild relatives of modern peanut plants have the ability to withstand disease in ways that modern peanut plants can’t. The genetic diversity of these wild relatives means that they can shrug off the diseases that kill farmers’ peanut crops, but they also produce tiny nuts that are difficult to harvest because they burrow deep in the soil.
The inaugural 2021 Georgia Precision Poultry Farming Conference attracted participants from poultry and egg industry representatives from more than 30 countries. CAES News
The inaugural 2021 Georgia Precision Poultry Farming Conference attracted participants from poultry and egg industry representatives from more than 30 countries.
Precision Poultry Science
On May 4, 2021, the Poultry Science Department at the University of Georgia (UGA) hosted the inaugural 2021 Georgia Precision Poultry Farming Conference virtually via Zoom. The day-long event was a UGA Cooperative Extension conference initiated by Lilong Chai, assistant professor and engineering specialist in the Department of Poultry Science, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, along with support from department administration and fellow faculty members and researchers. Chai also served as the moderator for the conference.
On May 10, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed the fiscal year 2022 state budget that designated $26.1 million for capital projects at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
On May 10, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed the fiscal year 2022 state budget that designated $26.1 million for capital projects at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Capital Gains
Gov. Brian Kemp signed the fiscal year 2022 budget for the state of Georgia on Monday, May 10, securing $21.7 million for the construction of phase one of a new Poultry Science Complex on the University of Georgia’s Athens campus.
Most of the U.S. was warmer, and the eastern two-thirds of the contiguous U.S. was wetter, from 1991–2020 than the previous normals period, 1981–2010. With 20 years of overlap between the current normals and the previous iteration (1991–2010), annual changes between these two data sets were somewhat muted compared to trends over the same period. Monthly and seasonal changes are more dynamic. For example, the current normals for the northern-central U.S. are cooler in the spring, while much of the Southeast is now warmer in October, cooler in November and warmer again in December. Atmospheric circulation dynamics and surface feedbacks result in substantial differences from month to month and region to region. CAES News
Most of the U.S. was warmer, and the eastern two-thirds of the contiguous U.S. was wetter, from 1991–2020 than the previous normals period, 1981–2010. With 20 years of overlap between the current normals and the previous iteration (1991–2010), annual changes between these two data sets were somewhat muted compared to trends over the same period. Monthly and seasonal changes are more dynamic. For example, the current normals for the northern-central U.S. are cooler in the spring, while much of the Southeast is now warmer in October, cooler in November and warmer again in December. Atmospheric circulation dynamics and surface feedbacks result in substantial differences from month to month and region to region.
New Normals
Day-to-day swings in temperature are an accepted part of the weather in many areas around the country. However, when 30-year averages of daily temperature fluctuations from thousands of stations around the country indicate a steady change in average temperatures over time, there are tangible implications for agriculture, energy consumption and many other aspects of daily life.