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Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter. CAES News
Georgia's peach crop is having a resurgence this year thanks to the lack of late freezes and sufficient chilling hours during the winter.
Backyard Fruits Webinar
Home gardeners who want to expand their edible backyard bounty to include fruits are invited to participate in the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Backyard Fruits webinar series that runs through June 5.
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas. CAES News
Since it launched in 2013 and 2014, Georgia’s citrus industry has grown to about 2,000 acres of commercial citrus planted in southern Georgia, primarily cold-hardy satsumas.
Preserving Citrus Productivity
With commercial citrus acreage on the rise in Georgia, producers should be aware of potential signs of citrus greening and the pests that carry the disease that has devastated the citrus industry in Florida.
UGA President Jere W. Morehead and Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black talk with Lee Cromley at Cromley Farms in Brooklet, Georgia. CAES News
UGA President Jere W. Morehead and Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black talk with Lee Cromley at Cromley Farms in Brooklet, Georgia.
Farm Tour
University of Georgia President Jere W. Morehead and Agriculture Commissioner of Georgia Gary Black were part of an annual farm tour that visited southeast Georgia on Wednesday, Oct. 2 to learn about the diverse makeup of the state’s agricultural industry.
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year. CAES News
Here's a picture of a homeowner's citrus tree in Camden County, Georgia infected by the citrus greening disease. Georgia’s citrus crop is expected to double in size this year.
Citrus Crop
The citrus greening disease that has devastated Florida’s industry over the past decade is not affecting Georgia production, but growers should still be aware of the potential danger it can bring, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.
Lowndes County Extension Coordinator Jacob Price examines a satsuma tree in Lowndes County in 2015. CAES News
Lowndes County Extension Coordinator Jacob Price examines a satsuma tree in Lowndes County in 2015.
Satsumas
Southern Georgia farmers growing ‘Owari’ satsumas are on track to harvest a bountiful crop of the citrus fruit at this time next year, according to Jacob Price, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension coordinator and Agriculture and Natural Resources agent for Lowndes County.
Jonathan Oliver recently joined the college as a fruit pathologist specializing in blueberries, blackberries, citrus, pomegranates, olives and mayhaws. CAES News
Jonathan Oliver recently joined the college as a fruit pathologist specializing in blueberries, blackberries, citrus, pomegranates, olives and mayhaws.
New Fruit Pathologist
Jonathan Oliver’s study of blueberries and his homegrown knowledge of citrus makes the Palatka, Florida, native a valuable addition to the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Mitchell County 4-H members Madison Birdsong and Courtney Conine plant a citrus tree. CAES News
Mitchell County 4-H members Madison Birdsong and Courtney Conine plant a citrus tree.
Citrus Trees
Citrus fruit cultivars recently released by University of Georgia scientist Wayne Hanna are part of a new citrus grove planted in Camilla, Georgia. The grove will serve as an education site and provide homegrown fruit for the inmates who will care for the grove. 
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird. CAES News
A syrphid or flower fly hovers over a swamp sunflower bloom. The tiny insect is sometimes called a hover fly because its flight pattern resembles that of a hovering hummingbird.
Pollinator Plan
Many food items, including fresh fruits and vegetables, would never make it to grocery store or farmers market shelves without the help of beneficial insects like honeybees and butterflies. The number of these pollinating insects in the U.S. is declining, and to help, Georgia agricultural experts developed a statewide plan to teach gardeners and landscapers how to care for their plants and protect these vulnerable insects that are vital to food production.
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach. CAES News
Mike Doyle, director of UGA Center for Food Safety, holds a bowl of spinach.
Produce and Pathogens
Mike Doyle doesn’t eat raw bean sprouts, medium-rare hamburgers or bagged salads. He isn’t on a special diet, but as director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Georgia, he studies the food pathogens that sicken thousands of Americans each year. For a time, foodborne illness was most often connected with undercooked meats; today, 33 percent of cases are tracked back to raw produce.