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High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
High winds uprooted a large oak tree on the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Georgia.
Post-storm landscape care
Tornadoes and heavy winds blew across Georgia in the early morning hours on April 13, killing eight Georgians, destroying homes, and leaving landscapes littered with downed trees and limbs. Strong weather is common in Georgia this time of year, and so is cleaning up after it, said David Dickens, professor of forest productivity with University of Georgia Cooperative Extension.
Endless summer hydrangea CAES News
Endless summer hydrangea
Wilted Plants
Plants with big leaves are often the first to get a little droopy in the hotter part of the day. It’s very tempting to water wilted plants at the end of the day, but late afternoon is not the best time.
Kendall Busher, a CAES horticulture student at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, leads a tour of the UGA Campus Arboretum, which is spread across campus. Busher created a web-based walking tour of the arboretum for the UGA Office of Sustainability. CAES News
Kendall Busher, a CAES horticulture student at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, leads a tour of the UGA Campus Arboretum, which is spread across campus. Busher created a web-based walking tour of the arboretum for the UGA Office of Sustainability.
Campus Arboretum
Usually, visitors to the University of Georgia associate trips to the Athens campus with the hedges and ball fields, but UGA horticulture student Kendall Busher wants them to consider the trees.
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue. CAES News
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp presented the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year award to Crawford County farmer Robert Dickey during a reception held Tuesday, March 19, at the Georgia Freight Depot in Atlanta. Pictured left to right are Kemp, Dickey, Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black and UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Dean Sam Pardue.
Top Farmer
Crawford County peach farmer Robert Dickey has been named the 2019 Georgia Farmer of the Year. A fourth-generation farmer, Dickey manages approximately 1,000 acres of peaches and 3,000 acres of timberland with the help of his 90-year-old father, Bob Dickey, his wife, Cynde Dickey, and their son and daughter-in-law, Lee and Stacy Dickey.
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia. CAES News
Pine trees toppled over after Hurricane Michael in Wilcox County, Georgia.
Timber
The Georgia Forestry Commission estimates that 2.4 million acres of timber were damaged by Hurricane Michael. This equates to $763 million in direct losses.
Freshly cut Christmas trees line Lowes in Griffin in this file photo. CAES News
Freshly cut Christmas trees line Lowes in Griffin in this file photo.
Christmas Trees
The holiday season is officially upon us. After a huge turkey dinner, many families begin decorating their homes. For many, the Christmas tree is the centerpiece of decorating and more and more people are choosing live trees.
Switchgrass CAES News
Switchgrass
Biofuel Crops
A research team led by the University of Georgia has discovered that manipulation of the same gene in poplar trees and switchgrass produced plants that grow better and are more efficiently converted to biofuels.
Snow coats leaves in March 2009 in Athens, Ga. CAES News
Snow coats leaves in March 2009 in Athens, Ga.
Snow Damage
North Georgia landscapes have been either dusted or covered with snow this December. Now, homeowners are dealing with the damage that trees and shrubs suffered as a result of heavy, wet snowfall causing vulnerable branches to bend and break.
Trees provide energy conservation benefits and offset the urban heat island effect when planted in urban landscapes. CAES News
Trees provide energy conservation benefits and offset the urban heat island effect when planted in urban landscapes.
Energy Savers
Trees can be valuable tools for reducing energy costs. Planting strategically placed trees in your landscape can reduce your energy costs over time and improve your landscape. It is not difficult to make a plan that can lead to savings by planting trees.