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The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately. CAES News
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately.
Groundnut animation
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately. The animations, produced by Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO), relay to smallholder farmers proven methods to protect and improve yield. The message of the videos was shaped through interviews and surveys with partners in Africa to ensure that the information is prioritized to have the most impact.
Danielle Essandoh, a master’s student at Makerere University in Uganda, grew out 376 lines of plants derived from peanut ancestors and looked for resistance to modern diseases. The project, headed by Soraya Leal-Bertioli at the University of Georgia, could result in new varieties that allow African farmers to fight plant diseases that can decimate a crop. CAES News
Danielle Essandoh, a master’s student at Makerere University in Uganda, grew out 376 lines of plants derived from peanut ancestors and looked for resistance to modern diseases. The project, headed by Soraya Leal-Bertioli at the University of Georgia, could result in new varieties that allow African farmers to fight plant diseases that can decimate a crop.
Student Profile: Danielle Essandoh
Danielle Essandoh always liked plants, but as she prepares to defend her master’s thesis for a degree in plant breeding from Makerere University in Uganda, she sees how her love of plants grew into a passion for helping people. Specifically, the work could lead to improved varieties that can withstand two particular diseases that can destroy groundnut crops in eastern Africa – groundnut rosette disease and late leaf spot.
Peggy Ozias-Akins, a global leader in the application of biotechnology for crop improvement, has been named UGA’s recipient of the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. She is pictured in her greenhouse surrounded by Pennisetum (pearl millet) hybrid plants. CAES News
Peggy Ozias-Akins, a global leader in the application of biotechnology for crop improvement, has been named UGA’s recipient of the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. She is pictured in her greenhouse surrounded by Pennisetum (pearl millet) hybrid plants.
SEC Faculty Achievement Award
Peggy Ozias-Akins, D.W. Brooks Professor and Distinguished Research Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named the University of Georgia’s recipient of the Southeastern Conference Faculty Achievement Award.  
Ivan Chapu has worked with hand-held sensors in groundnut test plots in Uganda as past of a three-country project to use the technology for high-throughput phenotyping. Now that he’s completeing a master’s degree from Makerere University, he hopes to continue on to a PhD. (Photo by Allison Floyd) CAES News
Ivan Chapu has worked with hand-held sensors in groundnut test plots in Uganda as past of a three-country project to use the technology for high-throughput phenotyping. Now that he’s completeing a master’s degree from Makerere University, he hopes to continue on to a PhD. (Photo by Allison Floyd)
Student Profile: Ivan Chapu
Ugandan graduate student Ivan Chapu has dedicated himself to adapting handheld sensors to help groundnut breeders generate resilient varieties that will help farmers to succeed. His passion for new technology led him in an unexpected direction – into a peanut field – where the Makerere University master’s student also discovered a love for research.
Soybeans grow on a plant at a UGA lab in Athens. Soybean farmers will soon have a smart phone app to help know when to irrigate their crop. CAES News
Soybeans grow on a plant at a UGA lab in Athens. Soybean farmers will soon have a smart phone app to help know when to irrigate their crop.
Local Soil Inoculant
In developing countries, the sustainable production of nutrient-dense crops is a critical need. A team of University of Georgia researchers have identified an affordable and local organic practice that can increase nutrient density in soybeans, or edamame, and improve soil health.
A 4S student from Reynaldo Salinas Institute in Honduras poses with produce he grew at home through the Honduras 4S From Home program. CAES News
A 4S student from Reynaldo Salinas Institute in Honduras poses with produce he grew at home through the Honduras 4S From Home program.
International 4-H Partnership
The University of Georgia, The Ohio State University and Zamorano Pan-American Agricultural University, a private university in Honduras, partnered to facilitate 4-H programming during the COVID-19 pandemic at six Honduran schools, reaching 180 students.
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut at the University of Georgia worked with Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO) to create the first of two animations covering good production practices in Malawi. CAES News
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut at the University of Georgia worked with Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO) to create the first of two animations covering good production practices in Malawi.
Peanut animation
The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Peanut and SAWBO (Scientific Animations Without Borders) have released the first of two animations highlighting peanut production practices that bring the highest yield and best quality groundnuts. The animations specifically address production in Malawi, but are broad enough to be used elsewhere.
Senegal relies on importing dairy products to meet the country’s needs, but there is significant potential to enhance economic development in rural areas by supporting small dairy producers, who are predominantly women. CAES News
Senegal relies on importing dairy products to meet the country’s needs, but there is significant potential to enhance economic development in rural areas by supporting small dairy producers, who are predominantly women.
Dairy Food Safety
The University of Georgia has received a $700,000 grant from the Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Safety to help improve food safety in the rapidly growing dairy industry in Senegal.
University of Georgia's Distance Diagnostics through Digital Imaging technology will be used for the first time in Central America to make accurate and rapid diagnoses in agriculture. CAES News
University of Georgia's Distance Diagnostics through Digital Imaging technology will be used for the first time in Central America to make accurate and rapid diagnoses in agriculture.
DDDI Goes International
Many countries struggle with food shipments being damaged or destroyed by invasive insects and plant disease. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, between 20% and 40% of global crop production is lost to pests, with plant diseases costing the global economy around $220 billion and invasive insects around $70 billion. The University of Georgia developed technology to identify these pests and is now partnering with a government organization in Central America — OIRSA — to implement this useful tool.