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A 4S student from Reynaldo Salinas Institute in Honduras poses with produce he grew at home through the Honduras 4S From Home program. CAES News
A 4S student from Reynaldo Salinas Institute in Honduras poses with produce he grew at home through the Honduras 4S From Home program.
International 4-H Partnership
The University of Georgia, The Ohio State University and Zamorano Pan-American Agricultural University, a private university in Honduras, partnered to facilitate 4-H programming during the COVID-19 pandemic at six Honduran schools, reaching 180 students.
The Christmas cactus is made up of colorful, iridescent bracts. This true cactus, minus thorns, is native to the South American rainforest. CAES News
The Christmas cactus is made up of colorful, iridescent bracts. This true cactus, minus thorns, is native to the South American rainforest.
Year-round Beauty
As vibrant holiday plants begin to adorn the shelves of hardware stores, grocery stores and garden centers, consumers are attracted to the pinks, reds and whites atop deep green foliage, which add festive pops of color in winter homes. The appearance of plants like poinsettias and Christmas cacti usher in the holiday season and we love to fill our halls and entryways with their holiday cheer. But what about after the holidays?
Jessica McGuire, with the nonprofit conservation organization Quail Forever, teaches students about wildlife conservation at Shiver Elementary School, where Grady County 4-H'ers planted a pollinator garden to help students understand the importance of protecting ecosystems. CAES News
Jessica McGuire, with the nonprofit conservation organization Quail Forever, teaches students about wildlife conservation at Shiver Elementary School, where Grady County 4-H'ers planted a pollinator garden to help students understand the importance of protecting ecosystems.
Preserving Pollinators
Eight Grady County 4-H’ers installed a pollinator garden at a local school as part of a yearlong program highlighting the importance of pollinators.
Growth of fairy ring fungi begin in the center of a ring and expand outward in a uniform, circular pattern over time. Mushrooms might only be visible during periods of wet weather, particularly in the fall. CAES News
Growth of fairy ring fungi begin in the center of a ring and expand outward in a uniform, circular pattern over time. Mushrooms might only be visible during periods of wet weather, particularly in the fall.
Fairy Rings
Many residents have noticed mushrooms popping up in lawns and landscapes this season. When the “fungus among us” forms a circle or arc pattern, it’s commonly known as a fairy ring. According to medieval folklore, they were thought to appear after a band of fairies had danced in a circle. In some cases, fairy ring mushrooms can cause turfgrass discoloration or abnormal growth in lawns.
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers tested biodegradable pots made from (left to right) wood pulp fiber, cow manure and coconut coir. CAES News
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences researchers tested biodegradable pots made from (left to right) wood pulp fiber, cow manure and coconut coir.
Sustainable Gardening
Professional and home gardeners alike can grow landscapes sustainably with the help of biodegradable plant containers, but gardeners may wonder whether these containers decompose quickly enough to avoid hindering plant growth.
Bob Westerfield, UGA Extension consumer horticulturist, demonstrates a pruning technique during a class held on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia. CAES News
Bob Westerfield, UGA Extension consumer horticulturist, demonstrates a pruning technique during a class held on the UGA campus in Griffin, Georgia.
Plant Pruning
To prune or not to prune, that is the question. Pruning is an important part of maintaining plant health and maximizing plant productivity. This is often a topic that brings fear and confusion, but pruning is, in fact, a beneficial and routine task.
A statewide survey is currently open to the public for anyone who is not already a Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer and may be interested in the program or its services. A Master Gardener, pictured here, takes photographs of insects at the UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin. (file photo) CAES News
A statewide survey is currently open to the public for anyone who is not already a Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer and may be interested in the program or its services. A Master Gardener, pictured here, takes photographs of insects at the UGA Research and Education Garden in Griffin. (file photo)
Master Gardener Survey
You may have relied on advice from a Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer in the past. Now they want your input to make plans for the future.
Many of the leaf spot diseases that are apparent on hydrangeas in the fall are actually the result of infections that occurred in the spring. Cercospora leaf spot, pictured here, is a common disease on bigleaf hydrangeas. CAES News
Many of the leaf spot diseases that are apparent on hydrangeas in the fall are actually the result of infections that occurred in the spring. Cercospora leaf spot, pictured here, is a common disease on bigleaf hydrangeas.
Seeing Spots
With all of the rain that we’ve experienced this year, many fungal leaf spot diseases are active. Hydrangeas are particularly susceptible to several different leaf spot diseases that favor moist weather. Some of the most common diseases people ask about are known as Corynespora leaf spot and Cercospora leaf spot on bigleaf hydrangeas.
Seeds for cultivars like ‘Mr. Lovell’s Wintergreens’ that have been passed down for generations in the north Georgia mountains will now be stored in refrigeration at the UGA Mountain Research and Education Center. (photo contributed by UNG) CAES News
Seeds for cultivars like ‘Mr. Lovell’s Wintergreens’ that have been passed down for generations in the north Georgia mountains will now be stored in refrigeration at the UGA Mountain Research and Education Center. (photo contributed by UNG)
Appalachian Seed Saving
Gold may be rare in the north Georgia mountains, but now the region boasts a seed bank that might be worth just as much to Appalachian natives and local gardening enthusiasts.