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Fulton County Extension staff and volunteers prepare to distribute produce bags through curbside pickup at a Fulton Fresh mobile market stop in Atlanta. (Photo by Molly Woo) CAES News
Fulton County Extension staff and volunteers prepare to distribute produce bags through curbside pickup at a Fulton Fresh mobile market stop in Atlanta. (Photo by Molly Woo)
Mobile Markets 2020
Mobile farmers markets are rolling again in metro Atlanta. Throughout the summer, Fulton Fresh and Fresh on DeK will continue serving fresh produce and delivering nutrition education to communities through curbside pickups and digital content.
With limited to no in-person contact with customers during the COVID-19 pandemic, for many growers, expanding online capabilities is crucial to business continuity. Join Georgia Grown and UGA Extension on June 17 for an e-commerce workshop featuring experts from the UGA Small Business Development Center. CAES News
With limited to no in-person contact with customers during the COVID-19 pandemic, for many growers, expanding online capabilities is crucial to business continuity. Join Georgia Grown and UGA Extension on June 17 for an e-commerce workshop featuring experts from the UGA Small Business Development Center.
SBDC Marketing Webinar
The University of Georgia is partnering with the Georgia Department of Agriculture to present a free digital marketing webinar for agribusiness owners looking for alternate ways to sell their products.
National 4-H Healthy Living Photo CAES News
National 4-H Healthy Living Photo
Healthy Habits at Home
Our nutrition and physical activity behaviors are not just the result of our personal choices. The environment or setting in which we live and family cultures and customs can also influence our choices and behaviors.
As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). CAES News
As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Malak Esseili has been focused on studying the microbial ecology of human viral pathogens (such as human noroviruses), and now her work includes the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
Coronavirus Research
When COVID-19 was identified, Malak Esseili stopped taking her children along on trips to the grocery store and she told her sisters to start wearing scarves as makeshift masks while in public. As an assistant professor of food virology at the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Esseili studied the emerging viral pathogen SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19).
Dr. John Peroni at an RBC research roundtable meeting. At the table, left to right, Hitesh Handa, Peroni, Lohitash Karumbaiah and Jason Locklin. (Submitted photo taken in 2018) CAES News
Dr. John Peroni at an RBC research roundtable meeting. At the table, left to right, Hitesh Handa, Peroni, Lohitash Karumbaiah and Jason Locklin. (Submitted photo taken in 2018)
Lymph System
A team including University of Georgia researchers has for the first time documented the regrowth of surgically removed pathways in the lymphatic system, a network of vessels designed to pump away inflammatory fluids and defend the body against infection.
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm. CAES News
A student working on the UGA Tifton Campus weighs tomatoes at the Blackshank Farm.
COVID-10 Ag Safety
Farmers and food processors take routine steps to reduce the likelihood of foodborne pathogens, like Salmonella and E. coli, contacting our food and causing illness. The procedures that our food industry takes on a daily basis are also effective in reducing the chances that the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 will come in contact with the food we eat.
Illustration by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has been named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). CAES News
Illustration by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which has been named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).
COVID-19 Resources
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension, in cooperation with North Carolina State University and other land grant universities, compiled a list of resources to assist the general public, farmers and the food industry during the COVID-19 pandemic.
With many Americans now rapidly adjusting to working or studying from home – often within arm’s reach of the refrigerator or pantry – the temptation to overeat is a real one, and it can have real consequences. CAES News
With many Americans now rapidly adjusting to working or studying from home – often within arm’s reach of the refrigerator or pantry – the temptation to overeat is a real one, and it can have real consequences.
Sheltered-in Overeating
Overeating is a normal reaction to being bored or anxious, but in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the phenomenon has taken on a new dimension. With many Americans now rapidly adjusting to working or studying from home – often within arm’s reach of the refrigerator or pantry – the temptation to overeat is a real one, and it can have real consequences.
Left, imaging of healthy neurons from mouse brain. Right, imaging of damaged neurons by PD protein clumps. CAES News
Left, imaging of healthy neurons from mouse brain. Right, imaging of damaged neurons by PD protein clumps.
‘Natural killer’ cells could halt Parkinson’s progression
Researchers at the University of Georgia’s Regenerative Bioscience Center and their colleagues have found that “natural killer” white blood cells could guard against the cascade of cellular changes that lead to Parkinson’s disease and help stop its progression.