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After molting into adults, periodical cicadas will move or fly to nearby vertical structures, especially shrubs and trees. The females will eventually lay their eggs on the ends of tree branches. CAES News
After molting into adults, periodical cicadas will move or fly to nearby vertical structures, especially shrubs and trees. The females will eventually lay their eggs on the ends of tree branches.
Tree Flagging
The emergence of Brood X exceeded expectations in north Georgia, as those of us who happen to reside in the “cicada zone” observed droves of periodical cicadas during the peak of the event. Over the past weeks, the song of the male periodical cicada has faded and fewer of these fascinating insects remain, but a sign of their passing is still evident.
Athens brewery Creature Comforts creates a saison beer that contains tulsi, also known as holy basil, a Southeast Asian herb grown at student-run farm UGArden. CAES News
Athens brewery Creature Comforts creates a saison beer that contains tulsi, also known as holy basil, a Southeast Asian herb grown at student-run farm UGArden.
Community Connection
Athens, Georgia, is known for three things — University of Georgia football, music, and food. Food is as much a part of the Athenian identity as the Bulldogs. Every weekend, football or not, restaurants around Athens are filled with both locals and students enjoying the communal environment a good local dish or beverage can offer.
The 2021 CAES Ratcliffe Scholars (clockwise from top left) are Amaja Andrews, Ashley Dombrowski, Zaharia Selman and Sofia Franzluebbers. CAES News
The 2021 CAES Ratcliffe Scholars (clockwise from top left) are Amaja Andrews, Ashley Dombrowski, Zaharia Selman and Sofia Franzluebbers.
2021 Ratcliffe Scholars
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) offers an exceptional array of courses taught by world-renowned professors — but it is often experiences beyond the walls of the classroom that truly set students apart.  
UGA Extension consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield checks bean plants for signs of disease and insects on the UGA campus in Griffin. Westerfield grows vegetables at work to be prepared to answer home gardener questions. He grows them at home for his dinner table. CAES News
UGA Extension consumer horticulturist Bob Westerfield checks bean plants for signs of disease and insects on the UGA campus in Griffin. Westerfield grows vegetables at work to be prepared to answer home gardener questions. He grows them at home for his dinner table.
Spring Vegetable Gardening
To call this past spring in Georgia normal would be a mischaracterization. Typical springs in Georgia seem to last about three days — and then we hit the hot weather. This spring, the cooler temperatures were most pleasant and hung on through the middle of May. Rainfall has also been feast or famine, and wind patterns have been higher than normal. Together, these conditions have made for a challenging time in the vegetable garden.
On May 10, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed the fiscal year 2022 state budget that designated $26.1 million for capital projects at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. CAES News
On May 10, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp signed the fiscal year 2022 state budget that designated $26.1 million for capital projects at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
Capital Gains
Gov. Brian Kemp signed the fiscal year 2022 budget for the state of Georgia on Monday, May 10, securing $21.7 million for the construction of phase one of a new Poultry Science Complex on the University of Georgia’s Athens campus.
The Passion hibiscus, developed by UGA plant breeder John Ruter, has burgundy and red leaves and bright-green flower buds that bloom into massive pink flowers. CAES News
The Passion hibiscus, developed by UGA plant breeder John Ruter, has burgundy and red leaves and bright-green flower buds that bloom into massive pink flowers.
Mother's Day Gifts
Plants and flowers are popular choices for Mother’s Day gifts each year and University of Georgia plant breeders are responsible for many beautiful varieties available in garden stores.
CAES Dean and Director Nick Place (left) and UGA blueberry entomologist Ashfaq Sial ceremonially plant the first blueberry bush in the new research orchard at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia. CAES News
CAES Dean and Director Nick Place (left) and UGA blueberry entomologist Ashfaq Sial ceremonially plant the first blueberry bush in the new research orchard at UGA's Durham Horticulture Farm in Watkinsville, Georgia.
Blueberry Research
Native to North America, blueberries are the most-recently commercially domesticated fruit in the U.S. Just a little over a century ago researchers began studying this wild berry with an intent to develop improved varieties for commercial cultivation.
Dario Chavez, associate professor of horticulture on the UGA Griffin campus, shows off the drip irrigation system in the peach orchard of the Dempsey Research Farm used to study irrigation and fertilization management for young peach trees. CAES News
Dario Chavez, associate professor of horticulture on the UGA Griffin campus, shows off the drip irrigation system in the peach orchard of the Dempsey Research Farm used to study irrigation and fertilization management for young peach trees.
Peach Irrigation
While peach orchards are a common sight throughout middle and south Georgia — helping the Peach State live up to its name — peach producers need more than just the title to ensure that both long-established groves and newly planted fields are successful.
UGA Cooperative Extension volunteers contribute thousands of hours of their time and effort to support youth, family and agricultural programming throughout the state every year. CAES News
UGA Cooperative Extension volunteers contribute thousands of hours of their time and effort to support youth, family and agricultural programming throughout the state every year.
Volunteer Power
Even in the midst of a global pandemic, volunteers have continued to make a positive impact for Georgians of all ages. Throughout Volunteer Appreciation Week April 19 - 23, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension is honoring thousands of volunteers who have dedicated their time to facilitate 4-H, Master Gardener and Family and Consumer Sciences programming on the county, district and state levels.