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Scientists working collaboratively in global research projects have grown accustomed to meeting on Zoom. As the ability to travel safely becomes a reality, the Innovation Lab will hold on to some of the communication habits and tools that proved useful. CAES News
Scientists working collaboratively in global research projects have grown accustomed to meeting on Zoom. As the ability to travel safely becomes a reality, the Innovation Lab will hold on to some of the communication habits and tools that proved useful.
Digital tech bringing teams together
The innovation lab held its second annual research meeting in a digital format in June, incorporating many of the lessons learned over the past year about how to make the most out of technology for long-distance meetings. To make the most of the ability to meet online, the management entity and many project teams in the Peanut Innovation Lab have shifted the way they get together.
The 2021 CAES Ratcliffe Scholars (clockwise from top left) are Amaja Andrews, Ashley Dombrowski, Zaharia Selman and Sofia Franzluebbers. CAES News
The 2021 CAES Ratcliffe Scholars (clockwise from top left) are Amaja Andrews, Ashley Dombrowski, Zaharia Selman and Sofia Franzluebbers.
2021 Ratcliffe Scholars
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) offers an exceptional array of courses taught by world-renowned professors — but it is often experiences beyond the walls of the classroom that truly set students apart.  
Lauren Pike, a rising senior studying agricultural communication, is the winner of the Broder-Ackermann Global Citizen Award. CAES News
Lauren Pike, a rising senior studying agricultural communication, is the winner of the Broder-Ackermann Global Citizen Award.
Global Citizen
Growing up in a traditional Swiss household in Georgia, the Broder family knew the value of community. The family immigrated from Switzerland and started a dairy farm south of Atlanta. It was a challenging adjustment, as the children balanced their family's culture with the culture of their new country. As immigrants, the Broders gained a personal appreciation for culture and an identity as citizens of the world.
From Alaska to Wyoming, hundreds of grateful alumni, friends, students and parents made gifts supporting the CAES during 2021's Georgia Giving Week April 17 to 23. CAES News
From Alaska to Wyoming, hundreds of grateful alumni, friends, students and parents made gifts supporting the CAES during 2021's Georgia Giving Week April 17 to 23.
Giving Week 2021
Hundreds of donors representing all 50 states showed their support for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences (CAES) during the third annual Georgia Giving Week April 17 to 23, with many gifts flooding in on Monday, the inaugural CAES Giving Day.
Farmers participate in a seed multiplication project led by extension personnel in Malawi. CAES News
Farmers participate in a seed multiplication project led by extension personnel in Malawi.
Technology and Culture
For decades, farmers in Kenya and Malawi have suffered declining agricultural productivity due to climate change and unsuccessful adoption of advanced agricultural technology. However, new research from the University of Georgia indicates that improving government policy while integrating indigenous methods with new technology will increase the productivity of struggling farms.
Sean Posey CAES News
Sean Posey
Student Profile: Sean Posey
Sean Posey didn’t see how agricultural economics would feed his love of math, but a decade into his grad school journey, he’s using those skills and interests to help improve farming practices in Africa. From information communication technologies to gender roles in information-sharing and incentivization programs that will improve groundnut health, Posey has been focused on improving agricultural practices and public safety for the past four years. At the University of Georgia completing his PhD, Posey is working on a research project led by professor Nick Magnan through the Peanut Innovation Lab
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately. CAES News
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately.
Groundnut animation
The Peanut Innovation Lab has posted the second in a pair of animations giving farmers valuable advice on growing groundnut. This edition focuses on late-season information related to harvest and storage, and might be shown together with the first animation or separately. The animations, produced by Scientific Animations Without Borders (SAWBO), relay to smallholder farmers proven methods to protect and improve yield. The message of the videos was shaped through interviews and surveys with partners in Africa to ensure that the information is prioritized to have the most impact.
Danielle Essandoh, a master’s student at Makerere University in Uganda, grew out 376 lines of plants derived from peanut ancestors and looked for resistance to modern diseases. The project, headed by Soraya Leal-Bertioli at the University of Georgia, could result in new varieties that allow African farmers to fight plant diseases that can decimate a crop. CAES News
Danielle Essandoh, a master’s student at Makerere University in Uganda, grew out 376 lines of plants derived from peanut ancestors and looked for resistance to modern diseases. The project, headed by Soraya Leal-Bertioli at the University of Georgia, could result in new varieties that allow African farmers to fight plant diseases that can decimate a crop.
Student Profile: Danielle Essandoh
Danielle Essandoh always liked plants, but as she prepares to defend her master’s thesis for a degree in plant breeding from Makerere University in Uganda, she sees how her love of plants grew into a passion for helping people. Specifically, the work could lead to improved varieties that can withstand two particular diseases that can destroy groundnut crops in eastern Africa – groundnut rosette disease and late leaf spot.
Peggy Ozias-Akins, a global leader in the application of biotechnology for crop improvement, has been named UGA’s recipient of the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. She is pictured in her greenhouse surrounded by Pennisetum (pearl millet) hybrid plants. CAES News
Peggy Ozias-Akins, a global leader in the application of biotechnology for crop improvement, has been named UGA’s recipient of the SEC Faculty Achievement Award. She is pictured in her greenhouse surrounded by Pennisetum (pearl millet) hybrid plants.
SEC Faculty Achievement Award
Peggy Ozias-Akins, D.W. Brooks Professor and Distinguished Research Professor in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named the University of Georgia’s recipient of the Southeastern Conference Faculty Achievement Award.